ENERGY STAR by the Numbers

ENERGY STAR® is the government-backed symbol for energy efficiency, providing simple, credible, and unbiased information that consumers and businesses rely on to make well-informed decisions. Thousands of industrial, commercial, utility, state, and local organizations—including more than 40 percent of the Fortune 500®—rely on their partnership with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to deliver cost-saving energy efficiency solutions. Together, since 1992, ENERGY STAR and its partners have helped save American families and businesses $430 billion—while also achieving broad emissions reductions—all through voluntary action.

Program-wide facts

  • ENERGY STAR certified products, homes, buildings, and plants helped Americans save 503 billion kWh of energy and $34 billion* in energy costs in 2015.
  • Since 1992, ENERGY STAR and its partners have saved American families and businesses $430 billion* in energy costs and 4.6 trillion kWh of energy, while achieving broad emission reductions—including 2.8 billion metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions.
  • More than 90% of American households recognize the ENERGY STAR.1
  • As of 2016, thousands of industrial, commercial, state, and local organizations—including more than 40% of the Fortune 500—rely on their partnership with EPA to achieve financial and energy savings.
  • Nearly 700 utilities—serving roughly 85% of American households—leveraged ENERGY STAR in their efficiency programs in 2016.
  • Nearly 290,000 American workers are involved in the manufacture of ENERGY STAR certified products and building materials, as of 2016.2

ENERGY STAR products

  • ENERGY STAR certified products helped consumers save $23 billion in energy costs in 2015, contributing to cumulative energy cost savings of $246 billion since 1992.*
  • By choosing ENERGY STAR, a typical household can save about $575 on their energy bills and still enjoy the quality and performance they expect.5
  • Americans purchased more than 300 million ENERGY STAR certified products in 2015, for a cumulative total exceeding 5.5 billion products (excluding purchases of light bulbs).
  • About three-fourths of U.S. households report the ENERGY STAR label as influential in their purchasing decisions.1 
  • EPA sets definitions of efficiency leadership for more than 75 residential and commercial product categories. Currently 50,000 product models have earned the ENERGY STAR based on these rigorous criteria.
  • The estimated annual market value of ENERGY STAR product sales is more than $100 billion.
  • More than 2,000 product models from more than 130 manufacturers were recognized as “ENERGY STAR Most Efficient” in 2016.
  • 80% of purchasers would recommend ENERGY STAR products to a friend.1

Learn more about ENERGY STAR products

ENERGY STAR for commercial buildings

  • The ENERGY STAR program for commercial buildings helped businesses and organizations save $7.8 billion in energy costs in 2015, contributing to cumulative energy cost savings of $144 billion since 1992.*
  • By the end of 2016, nearly 500,000 properties—representing about 50% of the nation’s commercial building floor space—have used EPA’s ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager® tool to measure, track, assess, and report on their energy and water consumption.
  • As of the end of 2016, 23 local governments and two states rely on EPA’s ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager® tool as the foundation for their energy benchmarking and transparency policies.
  • On average, ENERGY STAR certified buildings use 35% less energy than typical buildings nationwide.
  • More than 7,500 buildings earned the ENERGY STAR in 2016, bringing the total to 29,500.

Learn more about ENERGY STAR for commercial buildings

ENERGY STAR for industrial plants

  • The ENERGY STAR program for industrial plants helped businesses save $2.6 billion in energy costs in 2015, contributing to cumulative energy cost savings of $37 billion since 1992.*
  • As of 2016, 30 diverse industrial sectors work with ENERGY STAR to strategically manage their energy use, from cookie and cracker bakeries and pharmaceutical plants to integrated steel mills and petroleum refineries.
  • 87 industrial plants earned the ENERGY STAR in 2016.
  • 46 industrial plants achieved energy use reductions in the 2016 ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry campaign.

Learn more about ENERGY STAR for industrial plants

ENERGY STAR for new homes

  • The ENERGY STAR certified new homes program helped homeowners save $360 million in energy costs in 2015, contributing to cumulative energy cost savings of $2.5 billion since 1992.*
  • By choosing an ENERGY STAR certified home, homeowners can save up to 30% on their energy bills, while enjoying better quality, performance, and comfort. 
  • In 2016, more than 92,000 ENERGY STAR certified new homes were built, bringing the total to 1.7 million since 1995.
  • As of 2016, 88% of the nation’s top homebuilders build ENERGY STAR certified homes.
  • One out of every 10 homes built in 2015 was ENERGY STAR certified.

Learn more about ENERGY STAR new homes

References

  1. National Awareness of ENERGY STAR® for 2016: Analysis of 2016 CEE Household Survey, EPA Office of Air and Radiation, Climate Protection Partnerships Division, 2017, http://energystar.gov/awareness.
  2. U.S. Energy and Employment Report, U.S. Department of Energy, 2017, https://energy.gov/downloads/2017-us-energy-and-employment-report.
  3. The 2016 State Energy Efficiency Scorecard, ACEEE, 2016, http://aceee.org/research-report/u1606(link is external).
  4. Benchmarking and Disclosure: Lessons from Leading Cities, Boston Green Ribbon Commission, 2012,http://www.abettercity.org/docs/06.2012%20-%20Benchmarking%20report%20-%...(link is external)
  5. Typical House Memo, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 2016.

‡ The majority of data cited in this report is from 2016. In cases where 2016 data is not yet available, 2015 data is used. All instances are noted as such.

* Estimated energy cost savings represent the present value of net energy cost savings, calculated by taking the difference between total energy bill savings and the incremental additional investment in energy-efficient technologies and services.

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