Overview of Commercial Building Opportunities & Activities

The ENERGY STAR program provides EEPS a platform to promote continuous whole-building energy improvement. This page will help you plan ways to create new programs and add value to existing ones. You will find explanations of tools and resources for non-residential buildings, along with suggestions of how to get involved with ENERGY STAR to meet your energy goals. Learn about ways to get started or to expand on existing ENERGY STAR activities, and join us by becoming an ENERGY STAR partner.

Utilities — Partnering with ENERGY STAR

Account representatives can add value to their customer services by offering clients easy-to-use, freely available methods to continuously improve the energy performance of their buildings. ENERGY STAR tools will help customers establish baseline energy usage, evaluate building performance, analyze the financial benefits of a variety of energy-improvement strategies, design low-energy high-performance buildings, and much more. Strengthen your utility-client relationship by using ENERGY STAR to meet customer needs to save money by understanding their energy use and taking steps to increase efficiency.

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State Agencies — Partnering with ENERGY STAR

Your state can raise the profile of efforts to reduce energy use and emissions by leveraging the ENERGY STAR logo, creating partnerships with federal programs, and reaching out to individual building owners, business owners, local governments, and organizations. Provide building owners and managers with easy-to-use, freely-available methods to establish baseline energy usage, evaluate building performance, evaluate the financial benefits of a variety of energy-improvement strategies, design low-energy high-performance buildings, and much more. Promoting the use of these tools will increase general understanding of current energy use and promote adoption of activities that save energy and money.

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Energy Efficiency Organizations — Partnering with ENERGY STAR

Organizations working to promote whole-building energy improvements can leverage the recognition of the ENERGY STAR program, its message, and tools. Incorporate into programs the easy-to-use, freely-available methods to establish baseline energy usage, evaluate building performance, evaluate the financial benefits of a variety of energy-improvement strategies, design low-energy high-performance buildings, and much more. Promoting the use of these tools will increase general understanding of current energy use and promote adoption of activities that save energy and money. Tap into other ENERGY STAR resources, such as case studies, sector-specific research, and national partnerships to add value to your programs.

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Opportunities & Activities

Communicate the ENERGY STAR message.

  • Provide information about the benefits of improved energy performance in buildings - cost savings, better environmental quality, health, safety, and more.
  • Include the ENERGY STAR logo and a link to the ENERGY STAR homepage on your Web site.
  • Write a brief article for your newsletter or use a bill stuffer (utilities) to describe ENERGY STAR's buildings resources and activities in your area.
  • Encourage local newspapers and magazines to write an article about ENERGY STAR resources, products, or labeling achievements in your state.

Increase energy efficiency of private and public sector buildings.

  • Assess the energy performance of your own building.
  • Establish baseline energy performance.
  • Prioritize upgrades.
  • Monitor and track changes as you implement energy efficiency measures and improve operations and maintenance.
  • Institute product directories to create a product-purchasing directive.
  • (States) Work with other state agencies, schools, or local governments and use the rating tool to evaluate their buildings' energy performance and prioritize upgrades.

Provide training and education.

  • Sponsor training and education on energy efficiency tools, technology, and management strategies through train-the-trainer sessions.
  • Work with local networks such as those for architects (AIA), engineers (AHRAE), and building owners (BOMA) and, for example, provide certification opportunities through the Building Operator Certification (BOC) program.
  • Support commissioning activities and infrastructure for new and existing buildings.

Integrate with existing programs.

  • Enhance your on-going and future energy programs by tapping into ENERGY STAR resources to develop specifications for qualifying products in rebate programs or to make recommendations for sector-based programs.
  • Use the national energy performance rating tool to evaluate reductions in energy use in coordination with code compliance, or require benchmarking as a part of an executive order aimed at state government buildings.

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