3. O. LIGHTING—GENERAL

  • If every American home replaced just one light bulb with one that has earned the ENERGY STAR, we would:
    • Save enough energy to light 2 million homes for a year.
    • Save more than $460 million in annual energy costs.
    • Prevent nearly 6 billion pounds of greenhouse gas emissions per year, equivalent to the emissions from 550,000 cars.

      Note: “One bulb” refers to one CFL bulb.
      Source: U.S. EPA.
  • If every American home replaced their five most frequently used light fixtures or the bulbs in them with ones that have earned the ENERGY STAR, we would:
    • Save $5 billion each year in energy costs.
    • Prevent greenhouse gases equivalent to the emissions from 5 million cars.

      Note: This fact is based on the replacement of nine bulbs in five high-use fixtures.
      Source: U.S. EPA.
  • Bulbs and fixtures that have earned the ENERGY STAR produce about 70 percent less heat, so they're safer to operate and can cut energy costs associated with home cooling.

    Note: Energy savings of 70 percent equates to reduction in total heat output of 70 percent.
    Source: U.S. EPA.
  • By replacing your home's five most frequently used light fixtures or the bulbs in them with models that have earned the ENERGY STAR, you can save $40 each year.

    Note: This fact is based on the replacement of nine bulbs in five high-use fixtures.
    Source: U.S. EPA.
  • Ceiling fans with lights that have earned the ENERGY STAR are 60 percent more efficient than conventional fan/light units, saving you $175 in energy costs over the fan’s 10-year lifetime.

    Note: Savings for ceiling fans without lights are very small.
    Source: U.S. EPA.
  • A single light bulb that has earned the ENERGY STAR can save, on average, between $30 and $80 in electricity costs over its lifetime.

    Note: Because many CFLs exceed 10,000 hours, manufacturers may accurately assert higher savings for their specific product.
    Source: Energy saving: 33 kWh/year, 10,000 (CFL) or 25,000 hour life (LED); 3 hours of use each day.
  • A light bulb that has earned the ENERGY STAR can save $4 in electricity costs annually.

    Note: Bulb savings based on a weighted average of bulb type replacement. The dollar savings is very similar to the 33 kWh/year savings from replacing a 43-watt incandescent bulb with a 13-watt CFL.
    Source: Energy savings: 33 kWh/year; 3 hour use each day.
  • A single light [bulb or fixture] that has earned the ENERGY STAR prevents, on average, between 460 and 1,100 pounds of greenhouse gas emissions over its lifetime.
    Source: Energy saving: 33 kWh/year, 10,000 or 25,000 hour life, emissions factor = 1.54 pounds CO2/kWh, coal emissions = 2.14 CO2/pound coal.
  • Bulbs and fixtures that have earned the ENERGY STAR use about 70 to 90 percent less energy than standard bulbs and last 10 to 25 times longer.

    Note: Actual savings over incandescent range from 70–90 percent. The typical life of an incandescent bulb is 750–1,000 hours. Many ENERGY STAR certified screw–in CFL bulbs exceed the 10,000 hour minimum and many pin–based bulbs included with certified fixtures exceed their 10,000 hour minimum. Certified solid–state lighting lamps and luminaires are rated for 15,000–50,000 hours. Manufacturers may accurately assert higher hours on packaging.
    Source: U.S. EPA.
General Facts:
  • The average home has approximately 50 sockets or bulbs.
    Source: U.S. DOE, U.S. Lighting Market Characterization.

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Updated: September 2014